Time spent on the web can be oh-so tedious if you’re constantly cutting things from one page and pasting them elsewhere just to get to another, related page. Someday Linked Data may make this all better, but until then, we all get by with helpful tricks.

Bookmarklets are one essential weapon in the arsenal of the web-info-warrior. Usually they’re little JavaScript programs stored as a bookmark in Firefox, providing one-click access to some simple functionality like looking things up elsewhere, resizing your window, etc. I’ve blogged previously about bookmarklets to find local library sources for a book on an Amazon page (or PaperBackSwap).

I dusted off my bookmarklet skills this past week and came up with some nifty tools that i wanted to share.

First off, imagine you’re looking at a website with Bible references whose benighted author somehow failed to include RefTagger. So rather than a nice pop-up with the text of the reference, or even a helpful link to that text on some Bible site, you’re just looking at a inanimate, unlinked string: boo. The Bible Reference Bookmarklet to the rescue! Simply select the text of the reference, click the bookmarklet, and you’ll be whisked off to that reference at Bible.Logos.com. If you haven’t selected any text first, you get a dialogue box asking for it.

To get this goodie in Firefox, first make sure the Bookmarks Toolbar is showing (View > Toolsbars > Bookmarks Toolbar must be checked). I’d love to give you a link to just drag onto the toolbar, but i don’t seem to be able to get the code past WordPress. So go to Bookmarks > Organize Bookmarks, and select Organize > New Bookmark. Give it a useful name like “Bible Reference Lookup”, and paste the code below in Location field.

javascript:(function(){%20function%20getSearchString%20(promptString)%20{%20s%20=%20null;
if%20(document.selection%20&&%20document.selection.createRange)%20{%20s%20=document.selection.createRange().text;%20}%20
else%20if%20(document.getSelection)%20{%20s=%20document.getSelection();%20}%20
if%20(!%20(s%20&&%20s.length))%20{%20s%20=prompt(promptString,'');%20}
%20return%20s;%20}%20searchString%20=%20getSearchString('Bible%20Reference%20to%20look%20up%20:');%20
if%20(searchString%20!=%20null)%20{%20if(searchString.length)%20{%20location%20='http://bible.logos.com/#ref='+escape(searchString);%20}%20
else%20{%20location%20='http://bible.logos.com/';%20}%20}%20%20})();

After you’ve clicked ok, you should see it on your toolbar.

You can do similar tricks for a wide variety of strings that you just want to look up elsewhere (i discovered one here while writing this post that lets you look up articles on Wikipedia). This isn’t fundamentally different from copying the string into a search box: but sometimes it’s more convenient.

Descending into more esoteric purposes (to give you ideas for your own bookmarklets): as part of an earlier post on Tools for Personal Knowledge Management, i mentioned my use of TiddlyWiki for quick organization of hyperlinked notes. Like other wiki software, TiddlyWiki has its own link syntax, that looks like

[[Link text | URL]]

When linking to lots of other web pages, i was getting tired of copying the URL, pasting that in, then typing the square brackets, link text, vertical bar, and more square brackets, all in the right format. Wouldn’t it be more convenient to just construct this expression from the title of the page and its URL, rather than having to type it myself? YES! and the TiddlyWiki Page Link bookmarklet does just that, putting the result in a little pop-up window where a triple-click selects the whole thing, ready to copy and paste into your tiddlywiki (and tailor as desired: the title isn’t always what you want, but it’s often easier to edit and throw things out rather than type afresh). This one you can just drag to your bookmarks toolbar and use right away.

TiddlyWiki Page Link

Also, i’ve switched to a much better library lookup bookmarklet (and a service to help you create one for your local library) from WorldCat. Among other things, it generates the list of all the different ISBNs that might exist for a title (which can be very long indeed), and when there are many, it provides links for alternate searches in case the first group comes up empty handed.

Some other cool bookmarklets in my collection include:

  • CiteULike Popup Post and kin to make it easy to add (certain kinds of) articles to your reading list management. Adds more value for sources whose structure it understands.
  • Show del.icio.us citations of the current URL (you can find it there)
  • Resize your browser window to 1024 x 768 (if you want to see how a page will look on a smaller monitor or projector): the bookmarklet follows, just drag to your toolbar. 1024 x 768
  • A CSS validator for the current page: see Pete Freitag’s page.

Hat tips: